m.i abaga

The 5 Best Nigerian Diss-Tracks of 2019 So Far

Over the past few months, Nigerian hip-hop has been at war with itself. What started as a playful but audacious ‘Best Rapper In Africa’ brag spiralled the entire scene into a Royal Rumble-type frenzy that found rappers aiming for each other’s heads. From Blaqbonez to Payper Corleone to Davolee, everyone was churning out tracks laced with not-so-subliminal shots and outright name-drops. Even the OGs were not spared: a video surfaced online of A-Q and Ghost (of SDC) engaging in a presumably heated debate about who the superior wordsmith was.

All these eventually snowballed into an M.I Abaga vs Vector The Viper showdown. This beef which had been brewing for quite some time finally found the perfect climate for a face-off. In what will go down in history as one of the spiciest Nigerian hip-hop beefs, their back-and-forth resulted in a total of four diss tracks in just three weeks. Climaxing with M.I’s ‘The Viper‘ and Vector’s ‘Judas The Rat‘ and its bordering antics, hip-hop which had been playing second fiddle to Afrobeats in recent years was – howbeit briefly – restored to mainstream consciousness.

But now that the dust seems to have settled, Let’s look back to highlight some of the hottest diss tracks off this 2019 Nigerian rap civil-war.

5. Davolee – Give Away

This might not be as polished or popular as some of the other songs on this list, but it’s one of the hottest on the streets. Disgusted by Blaqbonez’s audacity to crown himself the best rapper in Africa without the credentials to back such claim, indigenous rapper Davolee attempted to devour the 100 Crowns rapper. The abrasive rapper aims with a submachine gun flow, with enough rounds for whoever is lurking as he also had choice words for M.I Abaga, Loose Kaynon, A-Q, Dremo, Falz, and Ycee. In fact, ‘Give Away‘ also led to a quick back-and-forth with the DMW rapper, Dremo.

4. Blaqbonez – Best Rapper In Africa

After declaring himself the Best Rapper In Africa in a scorching freestyle, many came out to counter his claim as to many he just wasn’t worthy to crown himself with such title. Several rappers released diss tracks to that effect, including Tentik and Payper Corleone. In his combined reply, ‘Best Rapper in Africa‘, Blaq reaffirms his claim as he tears apart his adversaries. He also came through with his ‘Control‘-moment, teasing and calling out his peers for a face-off.

3. Vector – Judas The Rat

When M.I Abaga dropped ‘The Viper‘, everyone thought it was over. The question on everyone’s lips was “how is Vector going to come back from this?” But Vector did the impossible and pulled a comeback reminiscent of 2005’s magic of Istanbul. With ‘Judas The Rat‘, Vector digs up more personal dirt on M.I, particularly pointing at his strained relationship with his brother, Jesse Jagz. He also highlighted some of M.I’s antics, painting him as a rat who favours only himself. The ripple effect from this diss was so strong that it provoked M.I’s fall from grace, reopening sores inspiring many to share some of their bummers with the former Chocolate City boss.

2.  M.I Abaga – The Viper

After quick successive jabs from Vector with ‘The Purge‘ and ‘Tetracycline‘, M.I just had to respond. And when he finally did, the self-acclaimed rap messiah did not disappoint as he delivered perhaps the best song off the entire pack. Over a gloomy and ominous self-produced beat, an assertive and gruff-voiced M.I comes through with witty rebuttals for Vector’s previous jabs. He further paints the Lafiaji rapper as a snake who has been envious of his success from the jump.

M.I turned things up a notch just a few days later at the 2019 Big Brother Naija finale.  Sporting a black shirt with a bold “No Snakes” imprint, M.I performed his brief set metaphorically stomping over a viper image projected on the stage.

1. A-Q – Distractions 2

A-Q has been having quite a good year. After years of churning out critically acclaimed personal projects including “Rose” and ”Blessed Forever”, A-Q came to many’s radars this year off the strength of his stellar verses on the Martell Cyphers. Also this year, he finally picked up the coveted Lyricist on the roll award at the 13th Headies which eluded him for years despite picking up nominations. 

Of all the diss tracks released this year, A-Q’s heinous Vector-aimed ‘Distractions 2‘ takes the cake. The belligerent rapper who had built a name for himself as a war-ready gladiator fit himself right into the Vector-M.I beef and came through with the most brutish diss track in the pack. On ‘Distractions 2’ the 100 Crowns boss brought a grenade to a knife fight, coming for Vector for with a swift jab-cross-left uppercut-cross combo that gave him the knockout in less than five minutes.  It’s a joy to know that his recent status as a label president hasn’t robbed him of his viciousness on the mic.

Uzikwendu And M.I Abaga Try To Out Rap Each Other In ‘Lyrical Cardio’

Just a few months after his message-driven ‘Rappers‘, Uzikwendu who prides himself as Nigeria’s fastest rapper is back with an Irockclassic-produced record titled ‘Lyrical Cardio‘. Making good of his promise of more music this year after a brief self-imposed hiatus, Uzi kicked things off this year with his 10-episode Friday Rap Day Series, followed by two impressive rap singles. And this new release featuring M.I Abaga is a worthy follow-up to the record in which a war-ready Uzikwendu rains hailstorm on rappers.

As the title implies, ‘Lyrical Cardio‘ finds both rappers flexing their lyrical prowess, speed and technical ability. Uzi opens the record, kicking things off immediately with a raw and relentless verse. M.I then steps into Uzi’s world in the next verse and gives him a run for his money, outpouring self-appraisal bars enwrapped in a bullish delivery. The song peaks in the third and last verse with Uzi dishing out his rapid-fire flows at a breakneck speed over anthemic chants.

This is, of course, one of the most exciting rap songs in 2019. Listen to the record here and let us know if you enjoyed it.

Erigga’s “The Erigma II” Is An Equivocal Celebration Of His Beloved City

Erigga is a true son of the soil. And like its predecessors, his new album, “The Erigma II” is a fitting testament to that fact. Released right in the heat of the Nigerian hip-hop civil war which seems to have briefly restored the relegated scene back to mainstream consciousness, this long-overdue sequel to his 2012 stunner “The Erigma” is an 18-track celebration of a city he has come to own: an ode to Warri.   

Erigga effortlessly possesses what many other rappers in these parts don’t; an identity. You don’t need a Google search to know where he’s from. Just hit play on any of his tracks and you’d most likely find out in the first four bars. Erigga has over the years proved himself a personal embodiment of Warri; a South-South oil-rich city, famed and celebrated for its pidgin, candour and fabled machismo. And if you know Erigga or his music well, you know this is what he represents. 

One of the markers of the Nigerian hip-hop eclipse in recent years has been the absence of a supportive local culture. In their futile quest for ‘purity’, Nigerian rappers, particularly English ones isolated themselves from their audience. A lot of them were not and still aren’t relatable and accessible. That is one thing Erigga and some of the indigenous rappers have tweaked earning them an expansive and loyal fanbase. 

Technically, Erigga might not be the most skilled or most gifted. But he is what hip-hop should represent. He has an unmediated connection to his community and through him, they are duly represented. The street at every point wants its story told and Erigga has proved himself a willing and worthy griot. That’s probably why his bars hit home and resonates the most.

See, you don’t need a 140-point IQ or Genius annotations to decode Erigga’s punchlines. You simply need to be a Nigerian. And if by chance you are adept with pidgin or come from the South-South, that’s a bonus.  When you hear lines like “Who wahala naked follow no dey use English pray” or “Fuck the world even if na me prick go pain” you’d probably pause the track and ask yourself, “na who born this guy??”

Erigga

Erigga

But the downside to his regional dominance is the simple fact that Warri just isn’t Lagos. The financial capital of the country also sits as the heartbeat of the Nigerian music industry. You can’t exactly be seen as fully “blown” if you haven’t conquered Gidi. And despite flashes of crossover successes, most recently with ‘Motivation’ which introduced many to the talents of Victor AD, Erigga has been long stuck on the brink of mainstream success. He has remained a regional success, and for the most part, a local hero catering to a niche audience that has been loyal from the jump.

On the new album, he delivers a heartfelt tribute to his cult-following on the ‘Next Track’. Here, he acknowledges that although the bulk of his fan base might not be as active on the internet, they are ever-present when he needs them. “Assuming say my fans get Instagram page, Followers go dey cry/ You don see me for stage?” he mutters before going on to list some of the events he recently shut down – reminiscent of Olamide’s legendary brag on ‘Eyan Mayweather’.

A Warri boy to the core, his verses, delivery, vocal tonality is usually in its rawest form. His stories are sculpted in unrefined rap verses and a delivery that might need some polishing. some might even say he has a monotonous flow. Erigga’s biggest strength is in telling his story delivered in its crudest and authentic form. Listening to Erigga is like gulping shots of vodka- it’s harsh at first gulp but intoxicating right after.  On the same ‘Next Track’, the unapologetic rapper dishing out some words for detractors who come at him for the vulgarity of his lyrics. “Wetin I wan talk wey snoop never talk before?” he asks

But this new album is at his best when Erigga is in his element, recounting area tales and doling out priceless gems of street survival tips.

With clear-eyed reflection, he paints a rough portrait of the gritty world he grew up in on the album opener, ‘Welcome To Warri’. A world where you are exposed to gruesome violence before you learn how to properly tie your shoelace. A world some of us only see in black hood movies. A world where your survival is dependent on how vicious you are or how fast your legs can carry you at the drop of a hat. He continues this story in ‘Victims’ where he describes a life where many of us were shielded from. A life some of us only witnessed in black movies like ‘Juice’. A life where you do your best to stay out of the way of hood fiends and the police. A world where you look around and find that most of your friends are either dead, in jail, or on their way.

Erigga

Erigga

In ‘Oyo’, assisted by Graham D and Vector, Erigga soundtracked some of the hardships we face in the poverty capital in the world whilst also doling out street knowledge. His verses on this track are perhaps the most heartfelt throughout this tape.  “Hunger dey slap man face for where him wife dey/ him las hope na Merrybet na where him life dey”. When he raps “My mama wey retire, government never pay her shishi/ You for see the responsibility them pack give me” “My text message na family account full am….” many of us can relate down to the last letter. Many of us have had to step up and take responsibility for the family as soon as you can. This is what is commonly called the ‘black man’s tax’.

When he raps “Who them shoot na him luck/ Wetin police hate pass: tattoo and dreadlock” it rings bells of youths being harassed by the police simply because of their fashion choices. Although Erigga largely doesn’t concern himself with the vanity project of proving superlatives, on ‘Street Motivation‘ he is self-assured and aware of the threat he poses to his colleagues. 

Erigga and Victor AD, two of the city’s most successful acts at the moment have their I-made-it moment on ‘Area To The World’. This record is their victory lap as Erigga recounts some aches he experienced as an artist on the rise and appreciating how far he has come since his ‘Mo Street Gan’ days. A city which has remained home for him throughout his journey.

On the final track,’Goodbye From Warri‘, we catch a glimpse of the old Erigga, as he reads off the rap sheet of his notorious “senior bros”: a threat the entire hood but who upon his imminent death advises a young Erigga to choose a different path. Sadly, this closer not only marks the end of this album, but also the end to Erigga’s efforts at recreating the past for our entertainment. In the final seconds of the record, he reveals frankly that, “this na the last time I go rap about my past mhen, make we face front.” 

All good things come to an end; sometimes to give way to something even better. Artists evolve. And as fans and listeners, we must learn to morph with them. Up until “The Erigma II,” Erigga has relieved his past for our entertainment but now is the time to move on. It was fun while it lasted but the show is over. 

Erigga has, over the years, quietly established himself as one of the key voices of his generation, raking up enough credentials to earn his place in the Naija hip-hop pantheon. And right now, we are even more excited to find out what the South-South rapper can be.

Alpha Ojini’s ‘Pop’ Is A Sizzling Trap Cut Without The Mumble

Amidst the earsplitting noise surrounding the M.IVector beef reignited by Vector’s latest jab, ‘Judas The Rat‘, Alpha Ojini gave us the first taste of the material he has been working on since last December. Earlier today, the multitalented rapper dished out a new number titled ‘Pop‘, his first offering since his celebratory ‘Madagascar‘ freestyle. This release officially kicks off the rollout of his sophomore album, “Chvmeleon,” which is set to be released in just a matter of weeks.

Just two days ago, he announced the released date and also revealed the mouthwatering tracklist featuring appearances from M.I Abaga, Ghost of SDC, Oxlade, Blaqbonez, and more. Apparently, ‘Pop‘ is only one of five tracks off the 14-track album on which Alpha appears solo.

On this self-produced record, Alpha is simply just having fun. Confidence and enthusiasm radiate throughout the dazzling production with a dominant trap bounce, as he employs cheeky and goofy bars enwrapped in prodigal wordplay. True to its name, ‘Pop‘ is a bop to kick off your weekend, and definitely one to keep us on our toes for the arrival of the imminent tape. Remember, “Chvmeleon” drops on Friday, November 11.

Listen to the single above and let us know what you think.

 

Alpha Ojini Is Bringing Along M.I Abaga, Ghost, GoodGirl LA, Ycee, Oxlade And More On “Chvmeleon”

Even if you do not know Alpha Ojini by name, you must have come across his work one way or another. Remember that sweet-toned “Focus” voice tag you hear at the end of most of your favourite 2019 rap songs? Yeah, that’s Alpha’s tagline for his sound engineering outfit.

A bundle of talents, Alpha is also a producer and a rapper – and he’s absolutely great at both. In fact, he was recently nominated in the Best Rap Single category of the 2019 Headies for his joint with Payper Corleone, ‘Sacrifices‘, one of the highlights off Payper’s stellar tape, “Fly Gangstar From The 90s.”

And now, it’s even more good news from Alpha as he announces the release of his sophomore album, “Chvmeleon,” which has been in the works since December last year. This is would be a follow-up to his well-received debut, “Half Price” that housed standouts like ‘Ocean Boy‘, ‘Ludo‘ and the cheeky ‘Yahooboy Muzik‘.

According to his recent tweet, this new album is scheduled for release on Friday, November 1st and it boasts a mouth-watering round of features, with appearances from some of the best wordsmiths in the game at the moment. On this self-produced project, Alpha is bringing along an a-team of M.I Abaga, Ghost (SDC), Paybac, Blaqbonez, Psycho YP, Ycee, Bella Alubo, Oxlade, Goodgirl LA and Kemi Smallz.

Now, tell me you’re not excited?

M.I Abaga Replies Vector On ‘The Viper’

Just a few hours after celebrating his 38th birthday, M.I Abaga has finally given his fans what they’ve been demanding for the past two weeks; his reply to Vector‘s ‘The Purge‘. The former Chocolate City boss finally makes good of his “seismic event” promise on the Martell Cypher 2 with this much-awaited diss track aptly titled ‘The Viper‘.

This is also the first track off M.I’s new “Judah” EP, scheduled for release on Wednesday, October 9. This 5-track project finds the rap veteran bringing along some of the sharpest MCs in the game at the moment, Blaqbonez, Alpha Ojini, Kauna, Buckyraw and Nawe.

Tracklist For "Judah" (Twitter/MI_Abaga)

Tracklist For Judah

Over a gloomy and ominous self-produced beat, a calm and collected M.I comes through with witty rebuttals of Vector’s previous jabs on ‘The Purge’ and ‘Tetracycling‘ while also coming through with blunt and brutal shot that might just be fatal.

M.I also accompanied this release with a personal message directed at the Lafiaji rapper where he accuses Vector of being a selfish, jealous and envious “snake.”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Viper The Viper has hated me for years as is its inevitable nature. The serpent has been thus since the beginning of time. Would always smile in my face but I could smell the envy and bitterness. Whatever he may use as his excuse for his career long actions it is simply jealousy beneath it all. This is why his career has never quite taken off and he has never lived up to his obvious potential. Search my tweets, or interviews you will see me praising him over the years, how come he has never said one good thing about me.. ever. Instead of responding in hate I have chosen to give the snake the secret to my success.. ‘help people’. You are the only rapper that has done nothing to bring anyone else up.. from your first producer LayLow to your former manager Michael (who now works for CC btw) to AQ your friend that year.. all you do is use people.. Olamide has given so many a platform, Ice Prince the same, Falz just an all round angel, Reminisce bringing up young legends.. don’t even compare yourself to me.. I am a fucking industry on my own!! see this is why you have always been a tier beneath the rap aristocracy! Because you are a jealous and envious person. Your fans are great sha.. because despite it they love you so much.. I pray you open your heart and let the message from God through me in.. it is time for you to live up to your full potential.. to enlarge your coast my son..enlarge your heart ♥️your music brand and career will blossom.. The VIPER available on my Youtube page – MI Abaga Link in Bio

A post shared by mi_abaga (@mi_abaga) on Oct 5, 2019 at 4:00am PDT

Check out ‘The Viper‘ above and let us know if you think this is the kill shot.

Vector Comes For M.I Yet Again On ‘Tetracycling’ Freestyle

Exactly a week after teaming up with Vader the Wildcard and Payper Corleone to reply the L.A.MB Martell Cypher 2 on ‘The Purge‘, Vector tha Viper has released yet another diss track for M.I Abaga titled ‘Tetracycling‘.

This comes as a surprise to many as they expected that the next voice in this battle would be M.I’s, aiming the kill shot at Vector with his reply for ‘The Purge‘. But Vector doesn’t seem to be done yet. Over this freestyle he tags a “warning shot”, he takes direct shots at the former Chocolate City boss hoping to strike the deathblow.

With this back-to-back diss, it feels like an M.I reply is imminent, because, hip-hop is quite unforgiving to those perceived as craven. But M.I is never one to run from a fight so I guess it’s just a matter of time.

Listen to this new diss track and tell us if this is a hit or miss.

Vader The Wildcard, Vector and Payper Corleone Come For Blood On ‘The Purge’

Vector tha Viper, Vader the Wildcard and Payper Corleone have come together for what they tag a ‘Masterclass Cypher’ to deliver a sizzling response to the week-old Martell Cypher 2 titled ‘The Purge‘.

With the opening verse, Vader the Wildcard recounts what down at the PGM Radio Show when Blaqbonez was challenged to defend his ‘BRIA‘ claim and he bailed, led by his label boss, A-Q. The rapper also addressed some of Blaq’s shots and also had enough rounds for his label execs.

A war-ready Payper Corleone, on the other hand, makes a good statement as to why his one of the most lyrical rappers in the game at the moment. Relaxed and assertive, he had enough shots for all the rappers with targets on their backs.

Coming through with a brutal closer, Vector tha Viper minces no words as he is in full battle mode, launching missiles at the former Chocolate City boss. Vector raps “But how do you go from Lebron to becoming a chairman this is insane” as he comes for M.I’s legacy with pristine bars for over two minutes.  This cypher, no doubt, delievers on an unsaid promise: it provides the rock-hard reply for the Martell Cyphers we have all been waiting for, giving the LAMB rappers a run for their money and could even be leaving them in body bags. LAMB-Martell, your move.

Listen yourself and let us know which cypher you think is better.

M.I, A-Q, Loose Kaynon & Blaqbonez Rain Hailstones In New Martell Cypher

Even though A-Q stole the show at the first instalment of the LAMB Martell Cypher, M.I‘s words were more profound. In his closing verse, the veteran suggested a team-up again with Loose Kaynon, A-Q and other lyrical titans “who deliver product” and make the cypher episodic. Well, exactly nine months after what will go down as one of the 2019 highlights of Nigerian hip-hop, Martell Cypher 2, ‘The Purification‘ is finally here. And although we expected this second instalment to feature new faces in the lineup, we still can’t complain.

This comes just about a month after the Hennesy Cyphers which was released to middling success. M.I had previously taken jabs at them in the first Martell Cypher that has recorded about half-a-million views on Youtube,  and he is back to show them how things are done. It also comes in the wake of the combative air in the hip-hop community following Blaqbonez’s controversial “best rapper in Africa (BRIA)” declaration.

This new cypher finds the LAMB rappers, Blaqbonez, A-Q, Loose Kaynon and M.I all suited up at the bar flexing lyrical muscles over the laid-back beat. Blunt and brutal, all four rappers come through with their braggadocio rap, whilst launching projector missiles at random targets. In his verse, M.I also paid respect to the late hip-hop legend, B-Elect

Enjoy the cypher above.

One Year After: Revisiting M.I Abaga’s “Yxng Dxnzl”

M.I was on a mission. Alongside Loose Kaynon, A-Q and Blaqbonez, the self-ascribed rap messiah decided to take on a noble quest to force a re-awakening for Nigerian hip-hop; a once-celebrated genre now relegated to the background.

Probably taking a cue from the Kanye-led 5-album Wyoming releases, these rappers came together under the acronym L.A.M.B -coined out from the first letters from their names- to stage a series of album releases in August 2018. Tagged the LAMB August releases, albums “Crown“, “Yung Denzl” and “Bad Boy Blaq” were the projects with which these rappers sought to restore and ensure the survival of the culture. 

All three projects were executive produced by M.I himself.

Exactly a year ago today, we got our hands on the long-teased and highly anticipated fourth studio album by Mr Incredible, “Yung Denzl,” the second offering in the string of the LAMB August rollout. But that was not his only release last year. 

A few months earlier, the revered rapper had released a highly collaborative surprise ‘playlist’ titled “Rendezvous,” which boasted appearances from an all-star cast including  AKA, Cassper Nyovest, Wande Coal, Ghost(SDC), and also introduced us to talents like Chillz. This dual 2018 release was perhaps in celebration of the tenth anniversary of his 2008 classic, “Talk About It,” his debut and introductory release which many claim to have ‘democratized’ Nigerian hip-hop.

A Study On Self Worth: Yxng Dxnzl” would be the first of a said three-album series that would include yet-to-be-released LPs, “A Study of Love” and “A Study of Society”. However, despite the anticipation for the project, the exhilaration surrounding it faded rather quickly for a project of such quality. This could have been as a result of the fact that unlike his last two albums, “Yung Denzl” did not rely on pop or radio-friendly formulas as he explored and experimented new sonic complexities on the album. Also, regardless of the laudable acclaim it got from critics, a huge number of listeners found it a bit too sombre, with some dismissing it as “TED Talk music“.  The promotion for the album was also rather deficient – perhaps in an effort not to eclipse “Crown” and “Bad Boy Blaq” given his huge star power- such that even a year later, we still haven’t gotten any visuals off the project despite rumours of its existence. 

This, however, takes nothing from the brilliance of the project. Well-timed, M.I lent his voice to the growing awareness about mental health and self-worth in the country. Over ten songs, he explored in several layers issues like self-doubt, low self-esteem and even more extremely, depression that many youths are battling in silence. A year later, this album is relevant as ever, spurring conversations in small corners. It might not seem like much, but the album is doing its bit.

He passed his messages not only through verses and hooks but also with fiery monologues and therapy sessions alongside the music to get his message across. Soundbites from his therapy sessions were prevalent throughout the album often coming at the end of a track, serving as a prelude to another. By putting his vulnerability out there, he shows fans and listeners that it’s okay to seek help when you need it.

For the most part, M.I works with a wealth of young talents on the album, shedding the spotlight on these acts and in turn tapping into their talents, sound and raw energy. A number of them like Odunsi, Lady Donli and Tay Iwar have gone on to drop their debut albums.

The album opens with a gruff whisper questioning our sense of identity, “do you know who you are?” it asks. Sticking to a simple rhyme scheme, M.I charges the black man to begin his journey to self-awareness and discovery.

On songs like ‘Last Night I Had A Dream’, ‘Stop Never Second Guess Yourself’ and ‘I Believe In You‘, M.I is concerned about our self-confidence, repeatedly nudging us to let go of our insecurities and self-doubt and find comfort in our skin.

Love Never Fails‘ reflects on missteps taken to check mental health in this part of the world largely as a result of culture and religion-induced ignorance.

Perhaps the most pop-leaning record on the album, ‘+/-‘ finds M.I alongside Odunsi and Lady Donli -new-gen frontliners- ridding themselves of all negativity vibes, focusing solely on the positives. 

In full elder statesman mode, M.I attempts to force a change with ‘You Rappers Should Fix Up’, fuming at the sorry state of the art. And say what you will about this record, it’s inarguable that it defibrillated a pulse back into the Nigerian hip-hop scene howbeit temporal.  

The penultimate track, ‘Self Evaluation Over Yxng Dxzl’ is the standout record off this project. Over a gloomy instrumental,  M.I drowns in darkness, picking up escapist vices to numb the pain. He does a good job taking a first-person narrative on the song putting himself in the shoes of a depressed creative, despite revealing that he actually hasn’t had a personal experience.

Picking up where he left off on ‘Everything’ off “Illegal Music 3“, M.I in ‘Do Not Be a Groupie‘ emphasises the importance of loyalty while decrying the deterioration of the virtue in today’s world, an issue he still touched on in his verse on SDC‘s ‘Respect, Loyalty and Honour‘.

It’s been one year since the “Yung Denzl” dropped and it’s still as relevant as ever. The LAMB August releases might not have saved Nigerian hip-hop but with this album, the legacy-focused veteran did something much more remarkable. In his mature and most refined self, he contributed to the growing awareness about our psychological well-being, a theme that rappers have come to be more open about this past year.  It is therefore needless to say that while Yung Denzl might not be his best or most popular album, it is by far the most important.

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